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Bermuda

 

Transportation

Everything you need to know about getting around in Bermuda

 

Private Transport

Taxi

 

Traveling by taxi in Bermuda is the most straightforward and convenient way of getting around, and the most expensive. All taxis are metered: when you get into a taxi the meter should read $4.80 (slightly more if the cab has been ordered, not hailed). Then expect to pay $6.40 for the first mile and $2.20 per mile thereafter.

 

Taxis often wait at popular tourist destinations and outside hotels. But if you’re having trouble finding one, you can always call one of the taxi companies direct. You can find the details of the main taxi companies here.

 

Some taxi drivers offer tours of the island for visitors to Bermuda: the going rate is around $40 an hour, but shop around for the best deal. Taxi drivers who have been officially certified by the Bermuda Government as local tour guides carry a blue flag on the bonnet (U.S. ‘hood’) of the car. ‘Blue-bonnet’ taxi drivers charge no more than regular taxi drivers, so if you’re planning to take a tour of Bermuda, a blue-bonnet taxi is probably the way to go.

 

Tipping is customary at a rate of 10-15%.

 

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Private Transport

Taxi

Scooters

 

Public Transport

Buses

Ferry

 

Accessible Bermuda

 

Did you know?

       

Scooters

 

With no car-hire in Bermuda, many visitors choose to hire a scooter for part or all of their stay on the island. It’s a convenient and fun way to get around, and gives you complete transport independence. In summer, the cool breeze as you zip along South Road is very welcome!

 

Caution is in order though: Bermuda’s roads are narrow and winding, presenting something of a challenge even when driving at 35 km/h (local speed limit). It is therefore advised that those seeking to rent a scooter be confident road-users in reasonable physical shape. Left-hand drive experience is a bonus.

 

50cc scooters are rented to visitors of age 16 and above at a cost of around $55 a day. Wearing a helmet is mandatory, and helmets are included in the price of the rental. A $30 non-refundable insurance policy is also factored into the scooter rental cost.

 

There are five main cycle liveries in Bermuda: Eve’s Cycles, Wheels Cycles, Oleander Cycles, Smatt’s Cycle Livery Ltd. and Elbow Beach Cycles. The liveries are conveniently located throughout the island, and your hotel can sometimes assist in arranging hire.

 

Top tips for successful scooter riding

 

  • • Remember to lean into the turn when going around corners. Counter-intuitive, but it’s simple physics!
  • • Avoid rush-hour traffic (at its worst between 8-9 am and 4.30-5.30 pm) if possible.
  • • Driving in the City of Hamilton can be tricky – there are lots of one-way streets and other traffic quirks. Drive with extra care.
  • • Avoid driving after dark.
  • • Carry raingear in your scooter seat-compartment – showers don’t usually last long, but they can be heavy.
  • • Never leave valuables in your scooter. Crime in Bermuda is relatively low, but tourist scooters are an easy target for opportunist thieves. 
   

couple riding moped in Bermuda

     
     
       

Public Transport

     

Buses

 

Travelers on a budget (or those for whom scooters present too terrifying a prospect) will be relieved to learn that Bermuda operates a safe, clean, reliable, regular, inexpensive, and perhaps most importantly, air-conditioned bus service.

 

The main bus terminal is located in Hamilton, near City Hall on Washington Street. Tickets, tokens and passes for multi-day travel are available here (see note on travel zones). It is possible to pay the bus fare in cash, but this works out as more expensive than purchasing a book of tickets. Exact change in coins (bills are not accepted) is also required: $3 for a short journey; $4.50 for a longer one.

 

Buses on all routes are pink and blue striped, so easily identifiable. Bus stops are marked with either blue or pink poles. A pink pole indicates that the direction of travel is towards the City of Hamilton; blue indicates bus travel away from Hamilton. All stops by request, so present yourself clearly at a bus stop, and when on board ring the bell well in advance of your bus stop. Your bus driver will be happy to help if you are unfamiliar with the route.

 

Note on travel zones

 

For the purpose of calculating travel costs, Bermuda is divided into 14 zones. When traveling by bus, short journeys are those which traverse 3 zones; bus journeys which cross more than 3 zones require a 14 zone ticket. You will need to take this into consideration when buying booklets of zone tickets. A map of Bermuda’s travel zones can be viewed here. Zone tickets purchased for bus travel can also be used on the ferry. See SeaExpress for more details. 

 

 

 

Did you know?

 

In Bermuda we drive on the left – a result of the island’s British colonial past.

 

There are subtle differences between mopeds and scooters, but the terms are used fairly interchangeably on the island. Locals are most likely to use the catch-all word ‘bike’.

 

Bermuda has a landmass of about 21 square miles, with approximately 130 miles of public paved roads.

       

Ferry

 

Probably the most scenic method of transportation around the island, the ferry can also get you places fast thanks to a new fleet of catamaran vessels introduced in 2002 which reach up to 30 knots.

 

There are three ferry routes which operate year-round: Pink (Hamilton-Paget-Warwick), Green (Hamilton-Rockaway), and Blue (Hamilton-Somerset-Dockyard). A seasonal Orange route which links Hamilton, Dockyard and St. Georges operates from April through mid-November. A quick glance at the map opposite will help you find the right route for your journey.

 

Fare information can be found on the SeaExpress website. Ferries no longer accept cash: tickets, tokens or passes must be used. Like bus tokens, these are available from a wide variety of locations on the island, but if in doubt, head to the Hamilton Ferry Terminal on Front Street. The staff will be happy to discuss which fare option is most suitable for you, based on the length of your stay and your expected ferry usage.

    bermuda ferry
       

Accessible Bermuda

 

Visitors with disabilities accustomed to accessibility provisions made in the United States or the UK may find that the facilities in Bermuda disappoint.

 

The ferry is by far the best option for wheelchair users wishing to explore the island. Most ferries and ferry terminals are wheelchair accessible, although it is recommended that you contact the Hamilton Ferry Terminal on 295-4506 for further information on specific terminals prior to traveling.

 

Public buses are not wheelchair-accessible at this time.

 

Taxis in Bermuda are usually large, and some have been adapted with disabled passengers in mind. However, it is worth enquiring whether a taxi can accommodate an electric wheelchair, a manual wheelchair, or both: some are only equipped to take one or the other. At present there is no legal obligation for a taxi driver to accept a disabled passenger. Taxis are not permitted to charge disabled passengers more than able-bodied passengers.

 

Vince Minors runs a company which specializes in accessible local transport. He is able to offer a range of services including airport pickup and tours of Bermuda with his wheelchair-accessible taxi and van. Contact him on 236-3089 or 337-2438. Access Bermuda runs Disabled Transit, a similar service organized by Keith Simmons who is himself in a wheelchair. He can be reached on 295-9106.

 

Disabled visitors to Bermuda might also like to consider contacting the Bermuda Physically Handicapped Association (BHPA) 293-5035 (9-5 local time) or 293-8148 (after 5pm local time). Their resources are limited, but if sufficient notice is provided the Association will do what they can to make their minibus (which is equipped for a manual wheelchair) available for excursions for the visiting disabled. 

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